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FanDeAliFee
11-16-2010, 12:33 PM
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franglais

Perhaps the oldest example of Frenglish in English literature is found in Henry V by William Shakespeare. A French princess is trying to learn English, but unfortunately, "foot" as pronounced by her maid sounds too much like foutre (vulgar French, "semen" or "to have sexual intercourse" when used as a verb) and "gown" like con (French "cunt", also used to mean "idiot"). She decides English is too obscene a language.

user472884
11-16-2010, 02:31 PM
I also like the nuances between Spanish and French...

So a Frenchman is practicing his Spanish skills with a Spaniard and says "Me gusta comer les gateaus"

wasabi622
11-16-2010, 02:46 PM
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franglais

Perhaps the oldest example of Frenglish in English literature is found in Henry V by William Shakespeare. A French princess is trying to learn English, but unfortunately, "foot" as pronounced by her maid sounds too much like foutre (vulgar French, "semen" or "to have sexual intercourse" when used as a verb) and "gown" like con (French "cunt", also used to mean "idiot"). She decides English is too obscene a language.

It could just be the other way around. :p

AlizéeInspired
11-16-2010, 07:54 PM
Hahaha! This kind of reminds me of buffalax-ing. Lol. It is basically the art of taking a non-english music video and giving it subtitles for what it sounds like in English. Here's a link (http://mylifemantra.wordpress.com/2007/10/09/buffalax/) that that tells a little about it with a few videos as well.

Here is a decent buffalaxed version of Alizée's J'en ai marre (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtB6lcpMzpY). It's the only one that is done of her that I know of. Most I've seen are of Indian music videos. Very funny stuff LOL. Check out the buffalax channel (http://www.youtube.com/user/buffalax#p/u) on YouTube :D

user472884
11-16-2010, 08:29 PM
You're just jealous your calculator ain't got no bow

Srd93
11-17-2010, 02:05 AM
Hahaha! This kind of reminds me of buffalax-ing. Lol. It is basically the art of taking a non-english music video and giving it subtitles for what it sounds like in English. Here's a link (http://mylifemantra.wordpress.com/2007/10/09/buffalax/) that that tells a little about it with a few videos as well.

Here is a decent buffalaxed version of Alizée's J'en ai marre (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtB6lcpMzpY). It's the only one that is done of her that I know of. Most I've seen are of Indian music videos. Very funny stuff LOL. Check out the buffalax channel (http://www.youtube.com/user/buffalax#p/u) on YouTube :D

Ahahaha oh wow, I was laughing non-stop the entire video because it's so true!

I've never even heard of buffalax'ing before now... Thank you for opening my eyes to a new form of entertainment. :D

AlizéeInspired
11-17-2010, 02:10 AM
Ahahaha oh wow, I was laughing non-stop the entire video because it's so true!

I've never even heard of buffalax'ing before now... Thank you for opening my eyes to a new form of entertainment. :D

Not a problem, bro :D. I only found buffalax-ing a week or so ago. Stumbled upon the J'en ai marre one, then watched some others. Gave me quite a good laugh. I'm so glad I found it! Funny stuff :D LOL

FanDeAliFee
11-17-2010, 06:48 AM
Hahaha! This kind of reminds me of buffalax-ing. Lol. It is basically the art of taking a non-english music video and giving it subtitles for what it sounds like in English.

A distinct but related form of language-translation-inspired reworking was pioneered (or at least popularized) in 1966 by Woody Allen's first film, What's Up, Tiger Lily? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What's_Up,_Tiger_Lily%3F). Allen slices up several low-budget Japanese "James Bond film" knock-offs, adds a few scenes, and then dubs the final cut with English to create a comedy.

You can also play a party game based on something even harder. You turn the sound off some film or television program and then try to extemporaneously supply amusing dialog. Naturally, the people doing this have to be pretty smart and creative!

P.S. If I invited a herd of buffaloes to a party at my house, I'd be damned sure NONE of them had swallowed any Buffalax(tm) in advance! Don't believe the nonsense of how "gentle" it works!

Mi-coton mi-laine
11-17-2010, 01:10 PM
Here is a decent buffalaxed version of Alizée's J'en ai marre (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtB6lcpMzpY). It's the only one that is done of her that I know of. Most I've seen are of Indian music videos. Very funny stuff LOL. Check out the buffalax channel (http://www.youtube.com/user/buffalax#p/u) on YouTube :D

Thanks for sharing! ;) All the parts about a moose! :D Johnny, Madonna have a mom! :D Mom, I'm an asshole! :D Palace of goose and icky blood! :D
What a bad loose/literal translation based on what you think it sounds like in English if you don't understand French on purpose as a joke, it's so funny!:D

Iwillmeether
12-29-2010, 11:18 AM
Or an english song, with the words you think they're saying:
<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/xLd22ha_-VU?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/xLd22ha_-VU?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

Lucian_RO
01-02-2011, 07:25 PM
I'm curious about the exact translation of the lyrics "Nevermore jamais plus/Tout est foutu". In one thread here it's translated as ".../Everything is ruined" but I think that is not very accurate.

DrSmith
01-02-2011, 07:29 PM
On alizee-reflections it says ‹&nbsp;Everything is messed-up&nbsp;›

user472884
01-02-2011, 09:52 PM
I love that about language... when some words don't translate exactly.....

It makes it so you have to learn "foutu" as "foutu", rather than "ruined/messed up"

wasabi622
01-03-2011, 02:12 AM
I love that about language... when some words don't translate exactly.....

It makes it so you have to learn "foutu" as "foutu", rather than "ruined/messed up"

I think that's sort of frustrating though..

For instance, I still have no idea what "youpidou" exactly means.

Another example is that, while I'm more fluent in English, there will be a certain term I'd like to use, but I'll only know how to express it in Korean. Now that there, is a very unusual situation for me.

VVVACCPLPNLY
01-08-2011, 04:05 PM
I think that's sort of frustrating though..

For instance, I still have no idea what "youpidou" exactly means.

Another example is that, while I'm more fluent in English, there will be a certain term I'd like to use, but I'll only know how to express it in Korean. Now that there, is a very unusual situation for me.

Oh I know kinda what you mean! Two points here:
1. In english, we have two present tenses. I am doing/ I do. The (be) -ing ending is a more exact present tense thing, that means right that second you are. The no ending form is more a word to express that you do something in general. Like, 'I work for the department of labor'. That doesn't mean you are working right now, it means that you are employed by them, but this very second you may be sitting at your house. So in other languages that lack this -ing form or an analog to it, I feel like I'm not being exact enough. But that's just how they work. But it still feels very awkward to say a French sentence saying I am doing something without throwing in an 'etre'. As opposed to Korean, where you still use a form of 'ittda' on your sentence, but you still don't use an -ing equivalent. In French you basically say Je fais, directly 'I do.' In Korean you say 'I do am'. Though in Korean ittda is the 'do am', it mean 'to be doing', so you don't throw in another word for do or be. So while in French you still have Je t'aime 'I you love', and in English you have I love you, in Korean you have Cheoneun dangshineul saranghamnida 'I you love-am-doing'. Very formal, but yeah. And it also functions as a be as in 'I am an American' 'Cheoneun Miguk saramisseumnida' (I American person-be). In French I like their 'be' better. Because Korean's 'be' basically also means have! Haha spazz out...
2. In Korean, there's a word that means something like intense sadness. But that's not really it though, it's something like that but not exactly. I read it in a book once, but can't remember what the word was. Many Koreans I know have said there's no way to translate it. What was that word? I kind of uinderstand it too, but I just can't remember what it was. Is that one of the things you can't describe in English?

Bigdan
01-08-2011, 08:39 PM
I think that's sort of frustrating though..

For instance, I still have no idea what "youpidou" exactly means.
.

don't worry ... "youpidou" doesn't mean anything. :p
it just a childish shout of satisfaction..

Iwillmeether
01-08-2011, 10:17 PM
2. In Korean, there's a word that means something like intense sadness. But that's not really it though, it's something like that but not exactly. I read it in a book once, but can't remember what the word was. Many Koreans I know have said there's no way to translate it. What was that word? I kind of uinderstand it too, but I just can't remember what it was. Is that one of the things you can't describe in English?

Depression?

VVVACCPLPNLY
01-09-2011, 02:14 PM
Depression?

haha no not depression

user472884
01-09-2011, 06:32 PM
For instance, I still have no idea what "youpidou" exactly means.


You learn as we've learned our own mother tongues.... we listen to the word, how and where it was used, the tone in which it was said, the reactions people had to the word, etc.

FanDeAliFee
05-09-2011, 03:23 PM
...............

Monro
05-10-2011, 02:41 AM
Alizee is pretty.